"hit" Definition | Free English Dictionary | international-dictionary.com
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meaning of "

hit

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Webster

English Word:

hit


English Pronunciation:

hit


Pronoun:


⇨Etymology

imperfect & past participle Hit; present participle & verbal noun Hitting., (Old English) hitten, hutten, of (Scandinavian) origin; confer (Danish) hitte to hit, find, (Swedish) & (Icelandic) hitta.


⇨Definition

(Italian, obsolete) Chaucer.

3d person sing. present of Hide, contracted from hideth. (obsolete) Chaucer.



Transitive Verb:


⇨Definition

1. To reach with a stroke or blow; to strike or touch, usually with force; especially, to reach or touch (an object aimed at). I think you have hit the mark. (Shakespeare)

2. To reach or attain exactly; to meet according to the occasion; to perform successfully; to attain to; to accord with; to be conformable to; to suit. Birds learning tunes, and their endeavors to hit the notes right. Locke. There you hit him;... that argument never fails with him. Dryden. Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the sense of human sight. Milton. He scarcely hit my humor. Tennyson.

3. To guess; to light upon or discover. "Thou hast hit it." (Shakespeare)

4. (Backgammon) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; -- said of a single unprotected piece on a point. To hit off, to describe with quick characteristic strokes; as, to hit off a speaker. Sir (Welsh) Temple. -- To hit out, to perform by good luck. (obsolete) Spenser.



Intransitive Verb:


⇨Definition

1. To meet or come in contact; to strike; to clash; -- followed by against or on. If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another Locke. Corpuscles, meeting with or hitting on those bodies, become conjoined with them. Woodward.

2. To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, -- often with implied chance, or luck. And oft it hits Where hope is coldest and despair most fits. (Shakespeare) And millions miss for one that hits. Swift. To hit on or upon, to light upon; to come to by chance. "None of them hit upon the art." Addison.



Noun:


⇨Definition

1. A striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything. So he the famed Cilician fencer praised, And, at each hit, with wonder seems amazed. Dryden.

2. A stroke of success in an enterprise, as by a fortunate chance; as, he made a hit. What late he called a blessing, now was wit, And God's good providence, a lucky hit. Pope.

3. A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark; as, a happy hit.

4. A game won at backgammon after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts less than a gammon.

5. (Baseball) A striking of the ball; as, a safe hit; a foul hit; -- sometimes used specifically for a base hit. Base hit, Safe hit, Sacrifice hit. (Baseball) See Base, Safe, etc.

having become very popular or acclaimed; -- said of entertainment performances; as, a hit record, a hit movie.



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Wiktionary

Etymology:

From Old High German hiutu, a contraction of hiu tagu, a calque on Latin hodie. Cognate with German heute, Dutch heden.


Synonyms:

šlágr


Noun:

hit (plural hits) A blow; a punch; a striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything. Dryden So he the famed Cilician fencer praised, / And, at each hit, with wonder seems amazed. The hit was very slight. A success, especially in the entertainment industry. The band played their hit song to the delight of the fans. Alexander Pope What late he called a blessing, now was wit, / And God's good providence, a lucky hit. 2012 February 9, Tasha Robinson, “Film: Review: Chico & Rita”: Chico & Rita opens in the modern era, as an aged, weary Chico shines shoes in his native Cuba. Then a song heard on the radio—a hit he wrote and recorded with Rita in their youth—carries him back to 1948 Havana, where they first met. An attack on a location, person or people. In the game of Battleship, a correct guess at where one's opponent ship is. (computing, Internet) The result(s) of a search of a computer system or, for example, the entire Internet using a search engine (Internet) A measured visit to a web site, a request for a single file from a web server. My site received twice as many hits after being listed in a search engine. An approximately correct answer in a test set. (baseball) The complete play, when the batter reaches base without the benefit of a walk, error, or fielder’s choice. The catcher got a hit to lead off the fifth. (colloquial) A dose of an illegal or addictive drug. Where am I going to get my next hit? A premeditated murder done for criminal or political purposes. (dated) A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark. a happy hit A game won at backgammon after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts for less than a gammon.


Verb:

hit (third-person singular simple present hits, present participle hitting, simple past and past participle hit) (transitive) To administer a blow to. One boy hit the other. 1922-1927, Frank Harris, My Life and Loves He tried to hit me but I dodged the blow and went out to plot revenge. 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses Episode 15 BELLO: (Shouts) Good, by the rumping jumping general! That's the best bit of news I heard these six weeks. Here, don't keep me waiting, damn you! (He slaps her face) BLOOM: (Whimpers) You're after hitting me. I'll tell 1934, Robert E. Howard, The Slugger's Game I hunted him for half a hour, aiming to learn him to hit a man with a table-leg and then run, but I didn't find him. (transitive) To come into contact with forcefully and suddenly. The ball hit the fence. 1726, Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels, Part II, Chapter V a dozen apples, each of them near as large as a Bristol barrel, came tumbling about my ears; one of them hit me on the back as I chanced to stoop, and knocked me down flat on my face. John Locke If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another? 1882, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Doctor Grimshawe's Secret: A romance Meanwhile the street boys kept up a shower of mud balls, many of which hit the Doctor, while the rest were distributed upon his assailants. (transitive, colloquial) To briefly visit. We hit the grocery store on the way to the park. (transitive, informal) To encounter. We hit a lot of traffic coming back from the movies. You'll hit some nasty thunderstorms if you descend too late. (transitive, informal) To reach or achieve. We hit Detroit at one in the morning but kept driving through the night. The temperature could hit 110° F tomorrow. The movie hits theaters in December. I hit the jackpot. 2012, August 1. Owen Gibson in Guardian Unlimited, London 2012: rowers Glover and Stanning win Team GB's first gold medal And her success with Glover, a product of the National Lottery-funded Sporting Giants talent identification programme, will also spark relief among British officials who were starting to fret a little about hitting their target of equalling fourth in the medal table from Beijing. (intransitive) To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, often by luck. Shakespeare And oft it hits / Where hope is coldest and despair most fits. Jonathan Swift Millions miss for one that hits. (transitive) To affect negatively. The economy was hit by a recession. The hurricane hit his fishing business hard. (transitive, slang) To kill a person, usually on the instructions of a third party. Hit him tonight and throw the body in the river. (transitive, card games) In blackjack, to deal a card to. Hit me. (intransitive, baseball) To come up to bat. Jones hit for the pitcher. (transitive, computing, programming) To use; to connect to. The external web servers hit DBSRV7, but the internal web server hits DBSRV3. (transitive, US, slang) To have sex with. I'd hit that. (transitive, US, slang) To inhale an amount of smoke from a narcotic substance, particularly marijuana I hit that bong every night after work To guess; to light upon or discover. Shakespeare Thou hast hit it. (backgammon) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; said of a single unprotected piece on a point.


Adverb:

Adverb hit (Alsatian) today Hit isch dr Jean-Pierre so drüri. — Jean-Pierre is so sad today.


Anagrams:

iht, ith


Reference:

hit

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