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pin

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Webster

English Word:

pin


English Pronunciation:

pin


Transitive Verb:


⇨Etymology

Confer Pen to confine, or Pinfold.


⇨Definition

(Metal Working) To peen.



Transitive Verb:


⇨Etymology

(Old English) pinne, (Anglo-Saxon) pinn a pin, peg; confer (Dutch) pin, German pinne, (Icelandic) pinni, (Welsh) pin, (Gaelic) & (Irish) pinne; all from (Latin) pinna a pinnacle, pin, feather, perhaps original a different word from pinna feather. Confer Fin of a fish, Pen a feather.


⇨Definition

To inclose; to confine; to pen; to pound.



Noun:


⇨Etymology

imperfect & past participle Pinned; present participle & verbal noun Pinning., See Pin, noun


⇨Definition

1. A piece of wood, metal, etc. generally cylindrical, used for fastening separate articles together, or as a support by which one article may be suspended from another; a peg; a bolt. With pins of adamant And chains they made all fast. Milton.

2. Especially, a small, pointed and headed piece of brass or other wire (commonly tinned), largely used for fastening clothes, attaching papers, etc.

3. Hence, a thing of small value; a trifle. He... did not care a pin for her. Spectator.

4. That which resembles a pin in its form or use; as: (a) A peg in musical instruments, for increasing or relaxing the tension of the strings. (b) A linchpin. (c) A rolling-pin. (d) A clothespin. (e, Machinery) A short shaft, sometimes forming a bolt, a part of which serves as a journal. See Illustration of Knuckle joint, under Knuckle. (f, Joinery) The tenon of a dovetail joint.

5. One of a row of pegs in the side of an ancient drinking cup to mark how much each man should drink.

6. The bull's eye, or center, of a target; hence, the center. (obsolete) "The very pin of his heart cleft." (Shakespeare)

7. Mood; humor. (obsolete) "In merry pin." Cowper.

8. (Medicine) Caligo. See Caligo. (Shakespeare)

9. An ornament, as a brooch or badge, fastened to the clothing by a pin; as, a Masonic pin.

10. The leg; as, to knock one off his pins. [Slang] Banking pin (Horology), a pin against which a lever strikes, to limit its motion. -- Pin drill (Mechanic), a drill with a central pin or projection to enter a hole, for enlarging the hole, or for sinking a recess for the head of a bolt, etc.; a counterbore. -- Pin grass. (Botanical) See Alfilaria. -- Pin hole, a small hole made by a pin; hence, any very small aperture or perforation. -- Pin lock, a lock having a cylindrical bolt; a lock in which pins, arranged by the key, are used instead of tumblers. -- Pin money, an allowance of money, as that made by a husband to his wife, for private and personal expenditure. -- Pin rail (Nautical), a rail, usually within the bulwarks, to hold belaying pins. Sometimes applied to the fife rail. Called also pin rack. -- Pin wheel. (a) A contrate wheel in which the cogs are cylindrical pins. (b, Fireworks) A small coil which revolves on a common pin and makes a wheel of yellow or colored fire.



Transitive Verb:


⇨Definition

To fasten with, or as with, a pin; to join; as, to pin a garment; to pin boards together. "Aa if she would pin her to her heart." (Shakespeare) To pin one's faith upon, to depend upon; to trust to.



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Wiktionary

Etymology:

From Middle English pinne, from Old English pinn (“pin, peg, bolt”), from Proto-Germanic *pinnaz, *pinnō, *pint- (“protruding point, peak, peg, pin, nail”), from Proto-Indo-European *bend- (“protruding object, pointed peg, nail, edge”). Cognate with Dutch pin (“peg, pin”), Low German pin, pinne (“pin, point, nail, peg”), German Pinn, Pinne (“pin, tack, peg”), Bavarian Pfonzer, Pfunzer (“sharpened point”), Danish pind (“pin, pointed stick”), Norwegian pinn (“knitting-needle”), Swedish pinne (“peg, rod, stick”), Icelandic pinni (“pin”). More at pintle. No relation to classical Latin pinna (“fin, flipper, wing-like appendage, wing, feather”), which was extended to mean "ridge, peak, point" (compare pinnacle), and often confused with Latin penna (“wing, feather”). More at feather.


Synonyms:

(small nail): nail, tack (cylinder of wood or metal): peg (games): skittle (jewellery fastened with a pin): brooch (accessory): badge


Noun:

The Tea room(+) is discussing this entry at the moment. Please come along and share your opinions on this and the other topics being discussed there. pin (plural pins) A small device, made (usually) of drawn-out steel wire with one end sharpened and the other flattened or rounded into a head, used for fastening. Milton With pins of adamant / And chains they made all fast. A small nail with a head and a sharp point. A cylinder often of wood or metal used to fasten or as a bearing between two parts. Pull the pin out of the grenade before throwing it at the enemy. A slender object specially designed for use in a specific game or sport, such as skittles or bowling. (in plural pins; informal) A leg. I'm not so good on my pins these days. (electricity) Any of the individual connecting elements of a multipole electrical connector. The UK standard connector for domestic mains electricity has three pins. A piece of jewellery that is attached to clothing with a pin. (US) A simple accessory that can be attached to clothing with a pin or fastener, often round and bearing a design, logo or message, and used for decoration, identification or to show political affiliation, etc. (chess) A scenario in which moving a lesser piece to escape from attack would expose a more valuable piece to attack. (curling) The spot at the exact centre of the house (the target area) The shot landed right on the pin. Shakespeare the very pin of his heart cleft (dated) A mood, a state of being. Cowper a merry pin One of a row of pegs in the side of an ancient drinking cup to mark how much each person should drink. (medicine, obsolete) caligo (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?) A thing of small value; a trifle. Spectator He did not care a pin for her. A peg in musical instruments for increasing or relaxing the tension of the strings. (engineering) A short shaft, sometimes forming a bolt, a part of which serves as a journal. The tenon of a dovetail joint.


Verb:

pin (third-person singular simple present pins, present participle pinning, simple past and past participle pinned) (often followed by a preposition such as to or on) To fasten or attach (something) with a pin. (chess, usually in the passive) To cause (a piece) to be in a pin. (wrestling) To pin down (someone). To enclose; to confine; to pen; to pound. (computing, graphical user interface) To attach (an icon, application, etc.) to another item. to pin a window to the Taskbar Alternative form of peen.


Anagrams:

nip, Nip, NIP, NPI


Reference:

pin

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